Overview

Nutley, a 3.5 square mile town of 28,000 residents that occupies the northeastern corner of Essex County, is well known for its 11 parks that cover over 100-acres. No home in Nutley is more than one half mile from a park or playground. Many families stay in Nutley for generations, attracted to its small town feel despite being less than a half hour drive to New York City.

Nutley is a jumble of shady lanes and quaint side streets. Most of town is residentially zoned, with industry allowed only in the fringe areas. The main commercial street, Franklin Avenue, bisects the community north to south. Property taxes in Nutley are typically lower than other Essex County municipalities.

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Nutley as its 38th best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the “Best Places To Live” in New Jersey

History

Nutley has a rich history associated with the arts. The first European settler in the area was a Dutch painter named Bastian Van Giesen. His house, known as Vreeland Homestead, still stands today on Chestnut Street and is the location of the Nutley Women’s Club.

In addition, Nutley is named for a turn-of- the-century artists’ community, located in the center of town. That area, called Nutley, was the home of Reginald Marsh, who painted many New York cityscapes, and Fredrick Dorr Steele, who illustrated most of the Sherlock Holmes short stories. The town officially adopted the name Nutley in 1902.

Schools

The Nutley Public Schools serve students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district are five elementary schools for students in grades K-6 – Lincoln, Radcliffe, Spring Garden, Washington and Yantacaw. John H. Walker is for Middle School students in grades 7 and 8 and Nutley High School for students in grades 9-12. Nutley High School has an enrollment of approximately 1300 students.

The Commute

Many residents of Nutley work in New York City, which is less than half an hour away by car by way of nearby Route 3 and the Lincoln Tunnel. New Jersey Transit buses makes stops along Kingsland Street and also takes about half an hour for its trip into the city.

Municipal Link

Municipal Website